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Big Picture and Details: Isaiah Devotional 2.13

he overarching theme of the second volume of Isaiah (chapters 40-66) is the advent of Messiah. Interwoven with the theme of Messiah as God’s true representative is the counter theme of the falsity of idols. The dividing line is between believers and non-believers, between God-followers and idol worshipers. There is no line between Gentiles and the sons of Jacob. God rejects the idol worshipers among his “own” people and from among the Gentiles. Conversely, God gives his singular Servant Messiah to believers from among his own people and to believers among the Gentiles. Thus speaks Isaiah, God’s prophet. … Continue readingBig Picture and Details: Isaiah Devotional 2.13

Covenant to a Race: Isaiah Devotional 2.12

Since the religious leaders of the Israelites in Jesus’s day misunderstood their own Scripture to the extent that they missed their own Messiah, why should we, who have the Holy Spirit, plus the hermeneutical key that Jesus gave his disciples (himself), and the example of all the New Testament writers–why should we make the same literalistic mistakes that they did? We have no reason today to suppose that Isaiah had no spiritual understanding. Even if the bulk of his listeners may not have, can we not grant that God’s Spirit broke through to Isaiah? Otherwise, why would he be quoted so often in the New Testament? I believe that the New Testament quotes Isaiah so often because Isaiah prophesied the Christ. … Continue readingCovenant to a Race: Isaiah Devotional 2.12

God Speaks: Isaiah Devotional 2.11

The Old Testament does not record the fulfillment of this prophecy of Isaiah (unless one counts the strictly local life and death of Cyrus the Persian). And God would not be God if this prophecy of Isaiah were not fulfilled. Thank God for the New Testament! Thank God for these “new things” (Isaiah 42:9) whose fulfillment the New Testament records. God always intended the Old and New Testaments to be a unified whole, the former prophesying in detail and the latter recording fulfillment of the former. … Continue readingGod Speaks: Isaiah Devotional 2.11

Characteristics of the Servant: Isaiah Devotional 2.10

“… and in his name shall the Gentiles trust” (Brenton), or, “will hope” (SAAS); Isaiah 42:4, LXX. Here is a direct, explicit statement in the Old Testament that the Christ’s ministry (the Servant whom God will anoint with his Spirit, see verse 1) will extend to and intentionally include Gentiles. (Clearly, the Church is not a “parenthesis,” as some Christians claim.) … Continue readingCharacteristics of the Servant: Isaiah Devotional 2.10

The Singular Servant: Isaiah Devotional 2.9

If the reader were to read Isaiah 41 followed immediately by Isaiah 43, the picture would be bleak, barren, depressing, and static. Isaiah 42:1-17 introduces the contrasts of joy, happiness, excitement, hope, and a flowing river that carries the depressed human soul forward. The book of Isaiah without the Servant would be utter darkness–just like the book of a human life without the Lord, Christ, God’s Servant Son. … Continue readingThe Singular Servant: Isaiah Devotional 2.9

Gleaning #5: Isaiah Journal 2.7

It is not the purpose of this blog to be contentious. Nevertheless, there seem still to be large numbers of Christians who cling to earthly, carnal, political fulfillment of God’s precious promises to all peoples everywhere from every tribe, language, people, and nation. God is inclusive, not exclusive. Reserving certain promises of God to those of a particular racial ethnicity robs other Christians of different ethnic descent of their full blessings in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:18-22). … Continue readingGleaning #5: Isaiah Journal 2.7

Gleanings #2-4: Isaiah Journal 2.6

Isaiah 41:4, LXX pops in the Septuagint text. The last two words state, “I Am.”

4 Who has wrought and done these things? he has called it who called it from the generations of old; I God, the first and to all futurity, I AM. (LXE, Brenton) 

A study note for this verse appears in the Orthodox Study Bible (3).

41:4 I Am, repeated twenty-seven times in chs. 41-49, means “I am the existing One.” This phrase is traditionally written in Greek in Christ’s halo on Orthodox icons (OΩN). This is how the Son and Word of God revealed Himself to Moses (Ex 3:14). … Continue readingGleanings #2-4: Isaiah Journal 2.6